This Month In History

Current Issue

September

September 1: The Labor Day Season begins. This signals the end to the rites of summer, a salute to working people, a celebration of the end of the formal vacation season, and a signal to get back to work.

September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland, triggering World War II. The world fell apart and had to be put back together again with blood, sweat, toil and tears.

September 2, 1945, Japan’s formal surrender.

September 3, 1939, Britain and France entered World War II.

September 3, 1783, was the formal end of the American Revolution when Britain and the U.S. signed the Treaty of Paris. 

September 4, 1951, transcontinental live television began.

September 5, 1774, the first Continental Congress began. These meetings produced in the following year the Second Continental Congress which adopted the Declaration of Independence.

Feedback . . .
Subscribe MedicalTuesday . . .
Subscribe HealthPlanUSA . . .

This Month In History

Previous Issue

August 1291, 1790, 1873

August 1, 1291, Swiss Independence Day, the founding of the Republic of Switzerland

August 1, 1790, the first U. S. census began. 

August 1, 1873, the anniversary of the introduction of San Francisco’s first cable car.  When electricity and the internal combustion engine replaced the horse, the horsecar disappeared; the steam locomotive was banished from city rights-of-way, and the bus in large measure displaced the earlier trolley tracts, and when the modernists sought to get rid of the cable car, the traditionalists—the tourist trade—won and the cable cars are  still operating for more than 140 years.

Feedback . . .
Subscribe MedicalTuesday . . .
Subscribe HealthPlanUSA . . .

This Month In History

Past Issue

July

July 1, is Freedom Day.  Also Canada Day: Canada became a self-governing British dominion on this day in 1867. Many nations—including our own—gained their freedom during this particular month of the year. France had its first revolution on July 14. Nations such as Algeria, Argentina, Colombia, Belgium, Peru, Liberia and Venezuela also gained self-government and freedom during this month.

On July 1, 1963, the U. S. Post Office inaugurated the postal zip-code system.

On July 2, 1777, Vermont became the first American colony to abolish slavery.

On July 3, 321 AD, Sunday was designated as a day of rest. (Others have placed it slightly earlier.)

On July 4 three U. S. Presidents died (Thomas Jefferson & John Adams—50 years to the day after they signed the Declaration of Independence in 1826; James Monroe—author of the Monroe Doctrine in 1831) and one future President was born (Calvin Coolidge, in Plymouth, VT in 1872).

On July 5, 1865, William Booth, a Methodist Minister, held the first meeting of the Christian Revival Association in East London. His mission was to establish “stations” where the poor and homeless could be fed and housed. This somewhat militaristic movement is better known as the Salvation Army.  

Feedback . . .
Subscribe MedicalTuesday . . .
Subscribe HealthPlanUSA . . .

This Month In History

Past Issue

April, 1789, 1963

In this month in 1963, my eldest daughter was born.

In this month in 1789, the U.S. House of Representatives finally achieved a quorum and went to work.

In this month in 1963, the first wartime U. S. Conscription law was passed.

Feedback . . .
Subscribe MedicalTuesday . . .
Subscribe HealthPlanUSA . . .

This Month In History

Past Issue

January

In this month in 1971, Congress banned all cigarette-oriented radio and television advertising.

In this month in 1997, California’s smoking ban was extended to bars and drinking establishments.

In this month in 1920, the National Negro Baseball League was organized. Read more . . .

In this month in 1988, Newsweek magazine announced that greed had gone out of style. Now Newsweek magazine has gone out of style.

Feedback . . .
Subscribe MedicalTuesday . . .
Subscribe HealthPlanUSA . . .