This Month in History

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October

On this month in 1000, Leif Erikson landed in North America

On this month in 1853, Turkey declared war on Russia.

On this month in 1889, Thomas Edison showed his first motion pictures

This Month in History

Current Issue

September

On September 1, 1181, Pope Lucius III begins a four-year reign, during which the former Cistercian monk founds the medieval inquisition. It condemned heretics and turned them over to civil authorities for burning.

On September 1, 1422, Henry VI, nine months old, becomes king of England. Within six weeks he also inherited the crown of France.

On September 1, 1807, Former U. S. vice president Aaron Burr is acquitted of treason, on a technicality. He had planned to seize American and Spanish territory in the West and to establish an independent republic.

On September 1, 1857, a French amphibious force launches an invasion of Vietnam with an attack on the port city of Tourane (modern-day Danang). This siege, a punitive campaign against the Vietnamese, was a Vietnamese victory.

On September 1, 1923, in Japan, a 7.9-magnitude earthquake destroys Yokohama and most of Tokyo, killing at least 142,000 people and demolishing the homes of 2.5 million more.

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This Month in History

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August

In some parts of this country, the days of August have a special name: the dog days of summer. It may refer to the doggedly hot temperatures  most regions encounter; others say it raises people’s tempers, causing some to bark like dogs; some say it’s like the laid-back attitude of a dog finding a shady tree to achieve comfort.

On August 1st in 1291, the Republic of Switzerland was founded. (Swiss Independence Day)

On August 1st in 1625,  the British Parliament moved to Oxford.

On August 1st, in 1790, the first U. S. Census was taken.

On August 2nd in 1922, Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, died. The United States phone system shut down for two whole minutes in deference to Bell. It was the only time in history that telephones throughout this nation went silent in unison for more than two seconds.

On August 2nd in 1939, Albert Einstein, wrote a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He was born in Ulm, Germany in 1879, winning the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921, escaped Nazi Germany and immigrated to the U.S. and championed the need for atomic research. Although a man of peace, he helped forge the key to the world’s most terrible weapon.

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This Month in History

Past Issue

This month in History: July, The 50th Anniversary of Going to the Moon on Apollo 11 July 16, 1969:

Launched at 9:32 AM from Kennedy Space Center Florida

Command Module Columbia circled the moon with Michael Collins on board.

Lunar Module Eagle with 2 stages orbited around the moon at 1000s miles per hour

Missed the planned landing requiring Armstrong to take control from the computer

He flew the Eagle manually to the sea of Tranquility with only 20 seconds of fuel to spare.

July 20, 1969: Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21 hours, 36 minutes on the Moon
     
& returned to the Columbia Command Module.

July 24, 1969: Splash-Down at 12:50 PM in the Pacific Ocean

Duration of the journey: 8 days, 3 hours, 18 minutes

Distance traveled: 953,054 miles (that would be more than 100,000 miles per day.)

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This Month in History

June

April showers may bring May flowers, but June heralds the end of the school year and the beginning of summer vacations. June is also traditionally the Marriage Month. More brides step up to the altar in June than in any other month in the year.

June 1, 1926, Norma Jean Baker was born in Los Angeles, CA. When she grew up, she dyed her hair blond and changed her name to Marilyn Monroe. She rose from a cameo role in a Marx brothers film to stardom in less than five years. She was the first cover girl on Playboy Magazine. When she married the all-American male, baseball player Joe DiMaggio, her fans loved her even more.

June 2, 1896, Great Britain granted Guglielmo Marconi the first wireless radio patent.

June 2, 1924, The U. S. Congress granted Native Americans citizenship.

June 2, 1953, Queen Elizabeth II was crowned at Westminster Abbey

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This Month in History

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May

May Day is Celebrated Throughout the World—Peasants in Europe, Military in Russia.

May 1., 1707:    Scotland and England merged to form Great Britain.

May 1, 1786:    Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro premiered in Vienna

May 1, 1884:    Construction of the first skyscraper—the Home Insurance Building—began in Chicago on LaSalle street. It was 10 stories tall.

On this same date: May 1, 1931, the Empire State Building was dedicated in New York City with 102 floors, 73 elevators, and an additional 62-meter pinnacle.

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April

On April 1, 1789: The U. S. House of Representatives finally achieved a quorum and convened.

On April 1, 1863: First wartime U. S. conscription law was enacted.

On April 14, 1536: Wales became part of England.

On April 18, 1775: Paul Revere Day: The Day he made his legendary ride.

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March

March is the same as September in the Northern Hemisphere. Each year March and June end on the same day of the week. It is the time of year when animals start to wake up from hibernation.

March 1, 1932 – The 20-month-old son of aviation pioneer Charles A. Lindbergh was kidnapped from his home in Hopewell, New Jersey. The Lindbergh’s then paid a $50,000 ransom. However, on May 12, the boy’s body was found in a wooded area a few miles from the house.

March 1, 1904 – American band leader Glenn Miller was born in Carilinda, Iowa. His music gained enormous popularity during the 1940’s through recordings such as Moonlight Serenade and String of Pearls. On December 15, 1944, his plane disappeared over the English Channel while en route to Paris where he was scheduled to perform

March 4, 1789 – The first meeting of the new Congress under the new U.S. Constitution took place in New York City.

March 4, 1830 – Former President John Quincy Adams returned to Congress as a representative from Massachusetts. He was the first ex-president ever to return to the House and served eight consecutive terms.

March 11, 1989 – the day the World Wide Web, was first proposed by computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee.

This Month in History

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February

February is American Heart month to be or become conscious of our heart health.

February 14 is St Valentine’s Day is a time for romance and to remember those we love.

February is Black History month and American History month, a time for love of our heritage.

And there is Groundhog Day for those that live in the immediate present.

On February 11, 1254, The British Parliament first convened.

On February 10, 1763, France ceded Canada to England.

On February 4, 1789, George Washington was elected U.S. president.

On February 1, 1790, the U. S. Supreme Court convened for the first time.

On February 2, 1848, the U. S. paid Mexico $15 million for the Southwestern lands.

On February 4, 1861, the Confederate States of America were organized.

On February 11, 1975, Margaret Thatcher became the first female head of the British Conservative Party

This Month in History

Past Issue

January 2019

Jan 11, 49 BC: Caesar crossed the Rubicon River in January.

Jan 2, 1900: Queen Victoria admitted she wasn’t amused.

Jan 3, 1882: Oscar Wilde to customs officials: “I have nothing to declare but my genius.”

On Jan, 1920, The U. S. government declared a war on the “demon alcohol” by passing the Eighteenth Amendment.  (more…)

This Month in History

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December 2018

Christmas comes but once a year, but the shopping season lasts much longer. There was a time when the advertising didn’t start before December. Slowly but surely the kickoff date was moved to November, the day after Thanksgiving. Then it was moved to October, even prior to Halloween. At this rate, in another century, we’ll be doing Christmas shopping all year long.

Then we’ll forget all about the meaning of Christmas. Maybe then the true meaning of Christmas was return to the 12-days of Christmas ending on Epiphany. Then the Orthodox can also reclaim their Christmas season.  (more…)

This Month in History

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November 2018

November is when the north winds begin to blow and herald the coming of winter. This month is also a time of migration: gray whales swim south to the warm waters of Mexico, ducks, geese, cranes, and even monarch butterflies fly south to escape the ice and snow; and many people now fly south to Florida and Arizona to warm their wear bones.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

October

Right between the lazy days of summer and the chilly days of autumn, there’s a time when the days are sunny and warm, the nights are crisp and cool. It’s called Indian Summer. The green leaves of summer begin to change their hue to yellow, orange, and burnt red; pumpkins and maize ripen in the fields. The name also serves to remind us of the days when Native Americans harvested nature’s bountiful array of nuts, fruits, and vegetables; fished its clear running rivers for salmon and trout; hunted the herds of wild buffalo; and stalked the mountains for bear, moose, and deer.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

September

September is the time when we traditionally conclude the rites of summer with the long Labor Day weekend. Intended to be a salute to working people, Labor Day has become a celebration of the end of the vacation season, signaling that it’s time to go back to work or for children to hit the books and go back to school.

On September 1, 1939, the Second World War began. It was ignited when Germany invaded Poland and was not extinguished until two atomic bombs were dropped upon Germany’s ally, Japan.

On September 1, 1972, Bobby Fisher won the international chess championship against Boris Spassky in Reykjavik, Iceland. (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

August

On August 1st, 1137, King Louis VI dies and is succeeded by his son Louis VII, who will launch the Second Crusade.
On August 1st, 1291, The Republic of Switzerland was founded. (
Swiss Independence Day.)
On August 1st, 1291, the communities of Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden form an alliance known as the Swiss Confederation to protect themselves against the Austrian House of Hapsburg. (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

July

July is the watchword for independence and freedom from Canada, the United States, Peru and other points south. The echoes of “libertè, egaliltè, fraternitè” chimed through France, Belgium, and then other African coastal nation of Algeria.

In July 321 AD, Sunday was proclaimed by Roman emperor Constantine as a day of Freedom from work and as a day of rest. Horace Greeley said in July, “To west, young man! God west!” Freedom is the wide-open spaces.

In 1863, The three-day-long confrontation that took place as The Battle of Gettysburg began.

July 1 is Canada Day.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

June

What does June 15th mean to you?

It’s the feast day of St. Vitus in Germany, the patron saint of comedians, dancers and Sicilians.

King John of England begrudgingly signed the Magna Cara on this day in 1215.

Margaret Jones became the first person executed in Massachusetts for witch craft in 1648.

Benjamin Franklin tied a key to a kite and discovered that lightning contained electricity in 1752.

The modern cork-centered baseball was patented in 1909 and rubber was patented in 1844.  (more…)

This Month in History

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May

On May 1, 1786, Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s opera The Marriage of Figaro premieres in Vienna.

On May 1, 1883, Legendary American hunter/showman/cowboy Buffalo Bill (William F. Cody) stages his first Wild West show.

On May 1, 1921, The U. S. Lighthouse Service begins guiding ships into New York harbor with a system of “radio fog signals.” These beacons ushered in a new means of electronic navigation.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

April

On April 2, 1963, my first-born daughter, Melanie Ann Meyer, was born.

On April 13, 1929, my oldest brother, Eldor William Meyer, was born.

On April 24, 1894, my father, Heinrich Dietrich Wilhelm Meyer, was born.

On April 30, 1931, my sister Nelda Arlene Meyer Schoennauer was born.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

September

September is the time when we traditionally conclude the rites of summer with the long Labor Day weekend. Intended to be a salute to working people, Labor Day has become a celebration of the end of the vacation season, signaling that it’s time to go back to work. But it is also a warning to children that it’s time to hit the books and go back to school. The month of September does remind us that even though hard work may be difficult to digest at times, we all savor the fruits of our labors.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

On August First

In some parts of this country, the days of August have a special name: the dog days of summer. Not meant to demean the canine species, this designation is an apt description of the Sweltering month. . . It’s not uncommon to hear people barking about the heat and the humidity, nipping at comments as if they’re meant to be insults. (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

March

On March 1, 1360, the young English author Geoffrey Chaucer, who later wrote The Canterbury Tales, is ransomed during the Hundred Years’ War by King Edward III, who paid £16 for his release.

On March 1, 1546, Protestant reformer George Wishart is burned at the stake on orders of David Beaton, the Roman Catholic archbishop of St. Andrews, England.   (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

February

On February 1, 1587, Queen Elizabeth I of England signs the warrant of execution for Mary, Queen of Scots.

On February 1, 1789, Vietnamese forces drive Chinese troops from the Vietnamese capital of Thang Long.             

(more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

December

Christmas comes but once a year, and unluckily the Christmas shopping season lasts longer than that. There was a time when Christmas advertising didn’t appear in newspapers, magazines, or on television until the first week in December. Slowly, but surely, the kickoff date was moved to the day after Thanksgiving. It was then forwarded to just before Halloween. This acceleration continued, and some ads occurred shortly after Labor Day. At this progressive rate, we’ll be Christmas shopping all year long! (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

November

November is when the north winds begin to blow and herald the coming of winter. This month is also a time of migration: gray whales swim south to the warm waters of Mexico; ducks, geese, cranes, and even monarch butterflies fly south to escape the ice and snow: and many people now fly south to Florida and Arizona to warm their weary bones.

On November 1, 1492, Italian Explorer Christopher Columbus, realizing he is not in Japan, decides that Cuba is the Chinese Mainland.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

July

July is Freedom Month: Many nations—including our own—gained their freedom during this particular month of the year. Canada became a self-governing British dominion on this day in 1867. France had its first revolution on July 14. Nations such as Algeria, Argentina, Colombia, Belgium, Peru, Liberia and Venezuela also gained self-government and freedom during this month.

July 1, 1946, the first postwar atomic bomb test was conducted at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands by the United States. (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

April

April showers may bring May flowers, but most of us are too busy worrying about our taxes to stop and smell the daffodils, tulips, lilies, and hyacinths which are some of the most popular blossoms of spring.

April 1 – April Fool’s Day; This is the day when the aquarium receives a lot of phone calls for Mr. Fish, Salt and sugar get switched, quarters are occasionally glued to the sidewalk, and all sorts of improbable tales are told with a straight face in the hope of declaring listeners to be April Fools. (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

March: National Anthem; World Standard time

March 3, 1931. The Star Spangle Banner became the national anthem. The “Star Spangled Banner” was written in 1814. On this date in 1931, 117 year later, it officially became our national anthem. We were using the “The Star Spangled Banner” as our national anthem long before it became official.  There is no law that says we have to wait for Congress to move before we tackle a problem through other means.  (more…)